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Limits of Empire

Limits of Empire PDF Author: Simon Forty
Publisher: Casemate
ISBN: 1636240771
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 200

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Book Description
The borders of the Roman Empire were frontiers that were often wild and dangerous. The expansion of the empire after the Punic Wars saw the Roman Republic become the dominant force in the Mediterranean as it first took Carthaginian territories in Gaul, Spain and north Africa and then moved into Greece with purpose, subjugating the area and creating two provinces, Achaea and Macedonia. The growth of the territories under Roman control continued through the rise of Julius Caesar – who conquered the rest of Gaul – and the establishment of the empire: each of the emperors could point to territories annexed and lands won. By AD 117 and the accession of Hadrian, the empire had reached its peak. It held sway from Britain to Morocco, from Spain to the Black Sea. And its wealth was coveted by those outside its borders. Just as today those from poorer countries try to make their way into Europe or North America, so those outside the empire wanted to make their way into the Promised Land – for trade, for improvement of their lives or for plunder. Thus the Roman borders became a mix – just as our borders are today – of defensive bulwark against enemies, but also control areas where import and export taxes were levied, and entrance was controlled. Some of these borders were hard: the early equivalents of the Inner German Border or Trump’s Wall – Hadrian’s Wall and the line between the Rhine and Danube. Others, such as these two great rivers, were natural borders that the Romans policed with their navy. This book examines these frontiers of the empire, looking at the way they were constructed and manned and how that changed over the years. It looks at the physical barriers – from the walls in Britain to the Fossatum Africae in the desert. It looks at the traders and the prices that were paid for the traffic of goods. It looks at the way that civil settlements – vici – grew up around the forts and fortlets and what life was like for soldiers, sailors and civilians. As well as artefacts of the period, the book provides a guidebook to top Roman museums and a gazetteer of visitable sites

Limits of Empire

Limits of Empire PDF Author: Simon Forty
Publisher: Casemate
ISBN: 1636240771
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 200

View

Book Description
The borders of the Roman Empire were frontiers that were often wild and dangerous. The expansion of the empire after the Punic Wars saw the Roman Republic become the dominant force in the Mediterranean as it first took Carthaginian territories in Gaul, Spain and north Africa and then moved into Greece with purpose, subjugating the area and creating two provinces, Achaea and Macedonia. The growth of the territories under Roman control continued through the rise of Julius Caesar – who conquered the rest of Gaul – and the establishment of the empire: each of the emperors could point to territories annexed and lands won. By AD 117 and the accession of Hadrian, the empire had reached its peak. It held sway from Britain to Morocco, from Spain to the Black Sea. And its wealth was coveted by those outside its borders. Just as today those from poorer countries try to make their way into Europe or North America, so those outside the empire wanted to make their way into the Promised Land – for trade, for improvement of their lives or for plunder. Thus the Roman borders became a mix – just as our borders are today – of defensive bulwark against enemies, but also control areas where import and export taxes were levied, and entrance was controlled. Some of these borders were hard: the early equivalents of the Inner German Border or Trump’s Wall – Hadrian’s Wall and the line between the Rhine and Danube. Others, such as these two great rivers, were natural borders that the Romans policed with their navy. This book examines these frontiers of the empire, looking at the way they were constructed and manned and how that changed over the years. It looks at the physical barriers – from the walls in Britain to the Fossatum Africae in the desert. It looks at the traders and the prices that were paid for the traffic of goods. It looks at the way that civil settlements – vici – grew up around the forts and fortlets and what life was like for soldiers, sailors and civilians. As well as artefacts of the period, the book provides a guidebook to top Roman museums and a gazetteer of visitable sites

The Limits of Empire

The Limits of Empire PDF Author: Robert J. McMahon
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231108812
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 276

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Book Description
In the years following World War II, as the United States began to focus on the global containment of communism, few regions of the world were considered as much of a potential battleground as Southeast Asia. Robert McMahon contends that policymakers exaggerated the significance of the region within the global power balance, dangerously overextending the United States and resulting in the tragedy of the Vietnam War.The first book to situate the Vietnam War in its broad, regional context, The Limits of Empire offers the most complete picture to date of how U.S. strategies of containment and empire-building spiraled out of control in Southeast Asia. Additionally, McMahon's analysis goes further than any previous study of U.S. security policy in Southeast Asia by following it through to the present, investigating how the demoralizing experience of Vietnam radically undermined U.S. enthusiasm for the region in a strategic sense. By conceptualizing the U.S. strategic mission as empire-building rather than merely containment, this book offers an insightful new way to understand America's failure in Vietnam--and also why this grim miscalculation did not lead to the balance-of-power catastrophe that some U.S. officials had forecasted. The Limits of Empire touches upon such broad theoretical concerns as the appeal of nationalist, anti-Western currents to Third World peoples; the inadequacy of empires as a means of asserting control over non-Western peoples; and the chasm between America's postwar ambitions and the sobering realization of the limits of its power.

The Limits of Empire: European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History

The Limits of Empire: European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History PDF Author: William Reger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317025334
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 414

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Book Description
This volume, published in honor of historian Geoffrey Parker, explores the working of European empires in a global perspective, focusing on one of the most important themes of Parker’s work: the limits of empire, which is to say, the centrifugal forces - sacral, dynastic, military, diplomatic, geographical, informational - that plagued imperial formations in the early modern period (1500-1800). During this time of wrenching technological, demographic, climatic, and economic change, empires had to struggle with new religious movements, incipient nationalisms, new sea routes, new military technologies, and an evolving state system with complex new rules of diplomacy. Engaging with a host of current debates, the chapters in this book break away from conventional historical conceptions of empire as an essentially western phenomenon with clear demarcation lines between the colonizer and the colonized. These are replaced here by much more fluid and subtle conceptions that highlight complex interplays between coalitions of rulers and ruled. In so doing, the volume builds upon recent work that increasingly suggests that empires simply could not exist without the consent of their imperial subjects, or at least significant groups of them. This was as true for the British Raj as it was for imperial China or Russia. Whilst the thirteen chapters in this book focus on a number of geographic regions and adopt different approaches, each shares a focus on, and interest in, the working of empires and the ways that imperial formations dealt with - or failed to deal with - the challenges that beset them. Taken together, they reflect a new phase in the evolving historiography of empire. They also reflect the scholarly contributions of the dedicatee, Geoffrey Parker, whose life and work are discussed in the introductory chapters and, we’re proud to say, in a delightful chapter by Parker himself, an autobiographical reflection that closes the book.

The Limits of Empire

The Limits of Empire PDF Author: Benjamin H. Isaac
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 510

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Book Description
The book won the Best Book Award for 1991 from the American Military Institute.

Limits of Empire

Limits of Empire PDF Author: Simon Forty
Publisher: Casemate
ISBN: 9781636240763
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 200

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Book Description
A study of the Roman borders, their role as defenses and control points and their impact on the Roman empire as a whole.

The Limits of Empire: European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History

The Limits of Empire: European Imperial Formations in Early Modern World History PDF Author: William Reger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317025326
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 414

View

Book Description
This volume, published in honor of historian Geoffrey Parker, explores the working of European empires in a global perspective, focusing on one of the most important themes of Parker’s work: the limits of empire, which is to say, the centrifugal forces - sacral, dynastic, military, diplomatic, geographical, informational - that plagued imperial formations in the early modern period (1500-1800). During this time of wrenching technological, demographic, climatic, and economic change, empires had to struggle with new religious movements, incipient nationalisms, new sea routes, new military technologies, and an evolving state system with complex new rules of diplomacy. Engaging with a host of current debates, the chapters in this book break away from conventional historical conceptions of empire as an essentially western phenomenon with clear demarcation lines between the colonizer and the colonized. These are replaced here by much more fluid and subtle conceptions that highlight complex interplays between coalitions of rulers and ruled. In so doing, the volume builds upon recent work that increasingly suggests that empires simply could not exist without the consent of their imperial subjects, or at least significant groups of them. This was as true for the British Raj as it was for imperial China or Russia. Whilst the thirteen chapters in this book focus on a number of geographic regions and adopt different approaches, each shares a focus on, and interest in, the working of empires and the ways that imperial formations dealt with - or failed to deal with - the challenges that beset them. Taken together, they reflect a new phase in the evolving historiography of empire. They also reflect the scholarly contributions of the dedicatee, Geoffrey Parker, whose life and work are discussed in the introductory chapters and, we’re proud to say, in a delightful chapter by Parker himself, an autobiographical reflection that closes the book.

An Historical Geography of Europe Abridged Version

An Historical Geography of Europe Abridged Version PDF Author: Norman J. G. Pounds
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 9780521311090
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 484

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Book Description
The central theme of this book is the changing spatial pattern of human activities during the last 2,500 years of Europe's history. Professor Pounds argues that three factors have determined the locations of human activities: the environment, the attitudes and forms of social organization of the many different peoples of Europe and lastly, the levels of technology. Within the broad framework of the interrelationships of environment, society and technology, several important themes pursued from the fifth century BC to the early twentieth century: settlement and agriculture, the growth of cities, the development of manufacturing and the role of trade. Underlying each of these themes are the discussions of political organization and population. Although the book is based in part of Professor Pound's magisterial three volumes An Historical Geography of Europe (1977, 1980, 1985), it was written especially for students and readers interested in a general survey of the subject.

Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism

Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism PDF Author: Onur Ulas Ince
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190637307
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 320

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Book Description
By the mid-nineteenth century, Britain celebrated its possession of a unique "empire of liberty" that propagated the rule of private property, free trade, and free labor across the globe. The British also knew that their empire had been built by conquering overseas territories, trading slaves, and extorting tribute from other societies. Set in the context of the early-modern British Empire, Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism paints a striking picture of these tensions between the illiberal origins of capitalism and its liberal imaginations in metropolitan thought. Onur Ulas Ince combines an analysis of political economy and political theory to examine the impact of colonial economic relations on the development of liberal thought in Britain. He shows how a liberal self-image for the British Empire was constructed in the face of the systematic expropriation, exploitation, and servitude that built its transoceanic capitalist economy. The resilience of Britain's self-image was due in large part to the liberal intellectuals of empire, such as John Locke, Edmund Burke, and Edward Gibbon Wakefield, and their efforts to disavow the violent transformations that propelled British colonial capitalism. Ince forcefully demonstrates that liberalism as a language of politics was elaborated in and through the political economic debates around the contested meanings of private property, market exchange, and free labor. Weaving together intellectual history, critical theory, and colonial studies, this book is a bold attempt to reconceptualize the historical relationship between capitalism, liberalism, and empire in a way that continues to resonate with our present moment.

Byzantine Warfare

Byzantine Warfare PDF Author: John Haldon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351953745
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 616

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Book Description
Warfare was an integral part of the operations of the medieval eastern Roman, or Byzantine, Empire, both in its organization, as well as in social thinking and political ideology. This volume presents a selection of articles dealing with key aspects of Byzantine attitudes to war and violence, with military administration and organization at tactical and strategic levels, weapons and armaments and war-making itself; discussions which make an important contribution to answering the questions of how and why the empire survived as long as it did.

Theodosius and the Limits of Empire

Theodosius and the Limits of Empire PDF Author: Mark Hebblewhite
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351594761
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 186

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Book Description
The emperor Theodosius I (AD 379–395) was one of the most remarkable figures of the late antique period. In the face of religious schism, political turmoil, and barbarian threats he managed to maintain imperial power and forge a political dynasty that would dominate both east and west for over half a century. This study, the first English language biography in over twenty years, traces his rise to power and tumultuous reign, and examines his indelible impact on a rapidly changing empire.