U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 PDF Download

Are you looking for read ebook online? Search for your book and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Download U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 PDF full book. Access full book title U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 by Etsuko Taketani. Download full books in PDF and EPUB format.

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 PDF Author: Etsuko Taketani
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9781572332270
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 236

Get Book

Book Description
An overdue examination of widely marginalized writings by women of the American antebellum period, U.S. Women Writers presents a new model for evaluating U.S. relations and interactions with foreign countries in the colonial and postcolonial periods by examining the ways in which women writers were both proponents of colonialization and subversive agents for change. Etsuko Taketani explores attempts to inculcate imperialist values through education in the works of Lydia Maria Child, Sarah Tuttle, Catherine Beecher, and others and the results of viewing the world through these values, as reflected in the writings of Harriet low, Emily Judson, and Sarah hale. Many of the texts Taketani uncovers from relative obscurity illuminate the American attitude toward “others” – whether Native American, African American, African, or Asian. She not only sheds lights on the life of the writers she examines, but she also situates each writer's works alongside those of her contemporaries to give the reader a clear picture of the cultural context. The Author: Etsuko Taketani is associate professor of English in the Institute of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Her articles have appeared in American Literary History, Children's Literature, Melville Society Extracts, and other publications.

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861

U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861 PDF Author: Etsuko Taketani
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9781572332270
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 236

View

Book Description
An overdue examination of widely marginalized writings by women of the American antebellum period, U.S. Women Writers presents a new model for evaluating U.S. relations and interactions with foreign countries in the colonial and postcolonial periods by examining the ways in which women writers were both proponents of colonialization and subversive agents for change. Etsuko Taketani explores attempts to inculcate imperialist values through education in the works of Lydia Maria Child, Sarah Tuttle, Catherine Beecher, and others and the results of viewing the world through these values, as reflected in the writings of Harriet low, Emily Judson, and Sarah hale. Many of the texts Taketani uncovers from relative obscurity illuminate the American attitude toward “others” – whether Native American, African American, African, or Asian. She not only sheds lights on the life of the writers she examines, but she also situates each writer's works alongside those of her contemporaries to give the reader a clear picture of the cultural context. The Author: Etsuko Taketani is associate professor of English in the Institute of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Her articles have appeared in American Literary History, Children's Literature, Melville Society Extracts, and other publications.

Uncle Tom's Cabins

Uncle Tom's Cabins PDF Author: Tracy C Davis
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472037765
Category : Performing Arts
Languages : en
Pages : 414

View

Book Description
As Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin traveled around the world, it was molded by the imaginations and needs of international audiences. For over 150 years it has been coopted for a dazzling array of causes far from what its author envisioned. This book tells thirteen variants of Uncle Tom’s journey, explicating the novel’s significance for Canadian abolitionists and the Liberian political elite that constituted the runaway characters’ landing points; nineteenth-century French theatergoers; liberal Cuban, Romanian, and Spanish intellectuals and social reformers; Dutch colonizers and Filipino nationalists in Southeast Asia; Eastern European Cold War communists; Muslim readers and spectators in the Middle East; Brazilian television audiences; and twentieth-century German holidaymakers. Throughout these encounters, Stowe’s story of American slavery serves as a paradigm for understanding oppression, selectively and strategically refracting the African American slave onto other iconic victims and freedom fighters. The book brings together performance historians, literary critics, and media theorists to demonstrate how the myriad cultural and political effects of Stowe’s enduring story has transformed it into a global metanarrative with national, regional, and local specificity.

The World Colonization Made

The World Colonization Made PDF Author: Brandon Mills
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812297326
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 288

View

Book Description
According to accepted historical wisdom, the goal of the African Colonization Society (ACS), founded in 1816 to return freed slaves to Africa, was borne of desperation and illustrated just how intractable the problems of race and slavery had become in the nineteenth-century United States. But for Brandon Mills, the ACS was part of a much wider pattern of national and international expansion. Similar efforts on the part of the young nation to create, in Thomas Jefferson's words, an "empire of liberty," spanned Native removal, the annexation of Texas and California, filibustering campaigns in Latin America, and American missionary efforts in Hawaii, as well as the founding of Liberia in 1821. Mills contends that these diverse currents of U.S. expansionism were ideologically linked and together comprised a capacious colonization movement that both reflected and shaped a wide range of debates over race, settlement, citizenship, and empire in the early republic. The World Colonization Made chronicles the rise and fall of the colonization movement as a political force within the United States—from its roots in the crises of the Revolutionary era, to its peak with the creation of the ACS, to its ultimate decline with emancipation and the Civil War. The book interrogates broader issues of U.S. expansion, including the progression of federal Indian policy, the foundations and effects of the Monroe Doctrine and Manifest Destiny, and the growth of U.S. commercial and military power throughout the Western hemisphere. By contextualizing the colonization movement in this way, Mills shows how it enabled Americans to envision a world of self-governing republics that harmonized with racial politics at home.

Gale Researcher Guide for: Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney and Women's Place in the New Nation

Gale Researcher Guide for: Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney and Women's Place in the New Nation PDF Author: Laura A. Leibman
Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1535848200
Category : Study Aids
Languages : en
Pages : 8

View

Book Description
Gale Researcher Guide for: Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney and Women's Place in the New Nation is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Bridging the Sino-American Divide

Bridging the Sino-American Divide PDF Author: Mei Renyi
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443811483
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 530

View

Book Description
Within China, the discipline of American Studies spans a wide variety of concerns and preoccupations, reflecting its practical diversity in a transnational setting. Essays in this volume by close to forty scholars, the majority most of them based in mainland China, reflect on the past history and current teaching of American Studies within China, placing these in comparative perspectives. The nature of globalization, the transmission of ideas and practices across cultural boundaries, the formulation and meaning of identity in cross-national communications, constitute major themes in contemporary American Studies in China. For officials and commentators alike, the past, present, and future state of Sino-American relations are also an overriding preoccupation of China’s America-watchers. Overall, this collection allows the reader to sample and appreciate the state of the field of American Studies in today’s China.

Archipelagic American Studies

Archipelagic American Studies PDF Author: Brian Russell Roberts
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822373203
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 520

View

Book Description
Departing from conventional narratives of the United States and the Americas as fundamentally continental spaces, the contributors to Archipelagic American Studies theorize America as constituted by and accountable to an assemblage of interconnected islands, archipelagoes, shorelines, continents, seas, and oceans. They trace these planet-spanning archipelagic connections in essays on topics ranging from Indigenous sovereignty to the work of Édouard Glissant, from Philippine call centers to US militarization in the Caribbean, and from the great Pacific garbage patch to enduring overlaps between US imperialism and a colonial Mexican archipelago. Shaking loose the straitjacket of continental exceptionalism that hinders and permeates Americanist scholarship, Archipelagic American Studies asserts a more relevant and dynamic approach for thinking about the geographic, cultural, and political claims of the United States within broader notions of America. Contributors Birte Blascheck, J. Michael Dash, Paul Giles, Susan Gillman, Matthew Pratt Guterl, Hsinya Huang, Allan Punzalan Isaac, Joseph Keith, Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Brandy Nalani McDougall, Ifeoma Kiddoe Nwankwo, Craig Santos Perez, Brian Russell Roberts, John Carlos Rowe, Cherene Sherrard-Johnson, Ramón E. Soto-Crespo, Michelle Ann Stephens, Elaine Stratford, Etsuko Taketani, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Teresia Teaiwa, Lanny Thompson, Nicole A. Waligora-Davis

The Cambridge Companion to Transnational American Literature

The Cambridge Companion to Transnational American Literature PDF Author: Yogita Goyal
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107085209
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 280

View

Book Description
This book provides a new map of American literature in the global era, analyzing the multiple meanings of transnationalism.

The New Middle Kingdom

The New Middle Kingdom PDF Author: Kendall A. Johnson
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421422522
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 384

View

Book Description
Spanning a full century, from the post–Revolutionary War era to the Gilded Age, The New Middle Kingdom is a vivid look at the Far East through Western eyes, one that highlights the importance of China in antebellum US culture.

American Literature in Transition, 1930–1940

American Literature in Transition, 1930–1940 PDF Author: Ichiro Takayoshi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108570577
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages :

View

Book Description
American Literature in Transition, 1930–1940 gathers together in a single volume preeminent critics and historians to offer an authoritative, analytic, and theoretically advanced account of the Depression era's key literary events. Many topics of canonical importance, such as protest literature, Hollywood fiction, the culture industry, and populism, receive fresh treatment. The book also covers emerging areas of interest, such as radio drama, bestsellers, religious fiction, internationalism, and middlebrow domestic fiction. Traditionally, scholars have treated each one of these issues in isolation. This volume situates all the significant literary developments of the 1930s within a single and capacious vision that discloses their hidden structural relations - their contradictions, similarities, and reciprocities. This is an excellent resource for undergraduate, graduate students, and scholars interested in American literary culture of the 1930s.

The Camera and the Press

The Camera and the Press PDF Author: Marcy J. Dinius
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812206347
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 320

View

Book Description
Before most Americans ever saw an actual daguerreotype, they encountered this visual form through written descriptions, published and rapidly reprinted in newspapers throughout the land. In The Camera and the Press, Marcy J. Dinius examines how the first written and published responses to the daguerreotype set the terms for how we now understand the representational accuracy and objectivity associated with the photograph, as well as the democratization of portraiture that photography enabled. Dinius's archival research ranges from essays in popular nineteenth-century periodicals to daguerreotypes of Americans, Liberians, slaves, and even fictional characters. Examples of these portraits are among the dozens of illustrations featured in the book. The Camera and the Press presents new dimensions of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, Herman Melville's Pierre, Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Frederick Douglass's The Heroic Slave. Dinius shows how these authors strategically incorporated aspects of daguerreian representation to advance their aesthetic, political, and social agendas. By recognizing print and visual culture as one, Dinius redefines such terms as art, objectivity, sympathy, representation, race, and nationalism and their interrelations in nineteenth-century America.